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Posted by on Nov 12, 2009 in Recipes | 4 comments

American Coffee Survival: A response to Korea Coffee Survival

American Coffee Survival: A response to Korea Coffee Survival

I don’t post too many recipes on this blog because I share most of my recipes on my YouTube page but sometimes an idea comes along that is so off the wall, or off-topic that I have to share it in a forum other than YouTube.

This is one of those “recipes”. I put the word recipes in quotes because this is not a recipe so much as it is a survival tool, a way to make coffee taste tolerable for my super-taster husband who drinks coffee because he has to, not because he wants to.

The inspiration for posting my tips for making instant coffee drinkable came when I read ZenKimchi’s version of doctored up instant coffee, which he titled Korea Coffee Survival.

Here are the ingredients for American Coffee Survival:

  • 2 tsp instant coffee (Raley’s Brand instant coffee is better than Folgers, Taster’s Choice or any named brand in hubby’s opinion.)
  • 4 tsp hot chocolate
  • 1 1/2 tsp of Stevia
  • 12 oz boiling hot filtered water
  • 4 oz of room temperature filtered water

The steps in order:

  1. Put all the above dry ingredients into a 16 oz. travel mug. 
  2. Heat approx. 12 oz of water in microwave.
  3. Pour hot water into the mug, which a friend affectionately nicknamed “Mr. Crusty”.
  4. Stir until coffee, hot chocolate and Stevia are dissolved.
  5. Top off with room temperature filtered water.

4 Comments

  1. That's a nifty idea for making a coffee drink that doesn't have tons of sugar!

  2. The nestle hot chocolate we use has splenda which helps the sweetness factor as well. The stevia is optional.

  3. Apart from Nestle, I'm clueless as to the brand names! What's Stevia?

  4. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia<br /><br />&quot;Stevia is a genus of about 240 species of herbs and shrubs in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), native to subtropical and tropical South America and Central America. The species Stevia rebaudiana, commonly known as sweetleaf, sweet leaf, sugarleaf, or simply stevia, is widely grown for its sweet leaves. As a sweetener and sugar substitute,

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