Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Aug 6, 2013 in Korean Food, Restaurant Reviews | 0 comments

Review: Food Café near Busan Station, Busan, South Korea

Review: Food Café near Busan Station, Busan, South Korea

Our last meal in Busan was at a restaurant called Food Café, which has several locations in and around Busan. We went to the one right across the street from Busan Station. We had to have something for lunch before our KTX high-speed train trip to Seoul.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
Hubby’s bubbling doenjang jjigae, right when it arrived at the table.

The restaurant was nearly full when we arrived. The waitress brought a note pad with all the menu items printed on it, all you had to do to order was circle the dish you wanted and about 15 minutes later, lunch was served. The menu list was longer than what chef Gordon Ramsay usually complains about on Kitchen Nightmares, but somehow the kitchen moved out our order despite the lunchtime rush.

I ordered 불고기 덮밥 bulgogi deopbap (sauteed savory-sweet beef over rice) and hubby got the 된장 찌개 doenjang jjigae (fermented soybean paste stew).

The jjigae included a couple of hidden clams were not divulged on the menu. However, in a seaside town like Busan, just expect that kind of thing. The stew also included enoki mushrooms (팽이버섯 paengi beoseot), 호박 hobak (zucchini), green onion and sliced green 고추 gochu (chilis).

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
Here’s the bulgogi deopbap. Notice that sneaky spoon invading my stirfry. (Tammy Quackenbush photo)

The bulgogi deopbap included paengi, carrots, white onions and sliced zucchini (hobak) squash. It came with a bowl of a beef-type broth. I thought I tasted some miso in there but the broth was not cloudy like most miso soups are.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
Our banchan (from L to R), kimchi, seaweed salad, & odeng. (Tammy Quackenbush photo)

The 반찬 banchan (side dishes) spread was modest including mild-medium spicy 오뎅 odeng (fish cake), seaweed salad and baechu kimchi. All the lunch dishes were between ₩3,000-₩7,000. The jjigaes and other soups were ₩3,000–₩5,000, the meat dishes were between ₩5,000–₩7000. Our total cost for the entire meal was about ₩10,500 — a very inexpensive meal. With its central location in view of the Busan train station, they probably get a lot of customers.

Working up a lunchtime hunger

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
Yes, that’s me on my iPhone, probably posting a comment on Foursquare.

Our last day in Busan began when an unexpected phone call from the States woke Hubby and I up at 6 a.m. Since we couldn’t get back to sleep, we got ready for the day to check out one more attraction in Busan before we started our trip to Seoul.

Our only planned destination was the Bokcheon Museum and the neighboring Bokcheon-dong Gaya-era burial ground, dating to the six century A.D.

It was a very peaceful glimpse into the Gaya Confederation‘s mysterious culture. Admission was free — at least when we visited — but I would have been willing to pay ₩10,000 to view the museum and the archaeological site at the burial ground.

The Busan History and Culture Tour Bus will take you to the Bokcheon Museum (for ₩10,000 per adult). But if you go there on your own, take the subway to Dongnae station. From there you can either take Bus 6 to Bokcheon Museum or catch a taxi.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Buffer
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
The hedges double as respectful burial markers. (Jeff Quackenbush photo)

If you’re young and physically fit — or cheap — you can do what we did and hike there from Dongnae station. The walk took about 20 minutes, a good part of it uphill at a 7 percent to 10 percent grade. It took us just over an hour to explore the museum and the grave sites.

After our visit to the burial ground, I kept threatening to catch a taxi back to the subway station. But I patiently hiked back down to the subway station instead.

Leave a Reply

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This