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Posted by on Mar 17, 2015 in Banchan (Side Dishes), Ingredients, Korean Food, Recipes, Vegetarian | 0 comments

Recipe: Broccoli Pickles

Recipe: Broccoli Pickles

Although broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable like cabbages and radishes, I would have never thought to pickle it since the florets are literally flowers. Who pickles flowers?

Almost any vegetable can be pickled if you do it right and cruciferous vegetables taste wonderful pickled. Much of Korea’s food culture is based on the premise. Even some fruits can be pickled. 

 

I added a citrusy note to my broccoli pickle by adding an ounce of Savory Spice Shop’s Citrus and Savory Brining pack to the boiling vinegar/water mix. It includes many of the traditional pickling favorites like garlic, bay leaves, allspice, and black pepper but also has lemon and orange peels added. 

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Pickled broccoli in the jar-o! (Tammy Quackenbush iPhone photo)

 

The added spice to the vinegar really did make the difference, even though I strained out the brining spices before bottling. 

Broccoli Pickles

Based on a recipe by Maangchi. Makes approximately 1 quart or 2 pints of pickles.

Pickled broccoli pairs well with other banchan such as radish kimchi and mung bean sprout namul. (Tammy Quackenbush iPhone photo)
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Pickled broccoli pairs well with other banchan such as radish kimchi and mung bean sprout namul. (Tammy Quackenbush iPhone photo)

5 cups water
¼ cup Celtic or Korean sea salt
¼ cup sugar (I used organic white sugar.)
½ cup of white vinegar (Apple cider vinegar also would work well. Just don’t use balsamic vinegar, please.)
1 ounce package of Savory Spice Shop’s Citrus and Savory Brining spice pack

  1. Pour 5 cups of water and ½ cup of apple cider vinegar into a large saucepan.
  2. Add the sea salt, sugar and spices to the pot and bring to a boil.
  3. Cut the broccoli into small, bite-sized florets, discarding the stem or skin off the rough parts.
  4. When the pickle juice boils, put the broccoli into a small strainer and in small batches dip the broccoli into the pickle juice.
  5. Once the broccoli barely turns bright green, pull them out and cool them down in an ice bath. Remove from the ice bath and add to your jar, leaving about a ½ inch of space at the top of the jar(s).
  6. Allow the pickle juice to cool down to room temperature.
  7. Strain the pickle juice and pour into the jar(s).
  8. Close with a lid and store in the refrigerator. 

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